Thursday, June 25, 2009

Buffet


Welcome to this week's links — enjoy.

Judy Holliday: An Appreciation
A wonderful appreciation by Stefany Anne Golberg of one of my all time favourite actors — Judy Holliday. Beautiful and brainy, Judy also had the most utterly perfect comic timing — if you haven't seen her in the classic Born Yesterday, you're in for a treat. Via The Smart Set.

Helen Dardik Bookplates
Yay! Awesome illustrator Helen Dardik is generously offering free downloadable bookplates on her blog, Orange You Lucky — choose from three cute designs, all ready to be printed out. Via How About Orange.

Peter Greenaway Brings Veronese to Life
This sounds like a spectacular show. For the Venice Biennale, artist and filmmaker Peter Greenaway has taken Veronese's High Renaissance painting The Wedding at Cana and turned it into a "... 50-minute digital extravaganza of light, sound, theatrical illusion and formal dissection ... projected onto and around a full-scale replica of (the painting).” Via Andrew (thanks!)

Did Cooking Make Us Human?
Harvard biological anthropologist and primatologist Richard Wrangham explores why humans evolved a need for cooked food in his new book, Catching Fire: How Cooking Made Us Human. He's come up with some surprising conclusions. Via Seed Magazine.

Pasta With Sun-Dried Tomatoes
And while we're talking about food — a delicious-looking pasta recipe by Ina Garten of the Barefood Contessa, perfect for a hot weather supper.

Top Ten Books About Brothers
James Runcie picks ten novels dealing with the complex relationships between brothers, ranging from The Brothers Karamazov by Dostoyevsky to The Tale of Three Brothers by JK Rowling.

Elegant Thrift
Grace at Design*Sponge has a great post this week about the home of Morgan Satterfield, who has the most amazing looking space — and makes it a rule to never spend more than $100 on any item for her home. An excellent lesson on how a great looking interior is all about having a good eye, rather than a good (sized) budget.

Letter From the Future
From the Boston Globe article by James O'Brien: "[O]n June 4, a laborer working on construction of the new American Wing at the Museum of Fine Arts knocked a hole in a wall and saw an envelope sticking out of the rubble." It was "a typewritten note from 1926, a letter to the future from a long-ago laborer who helped build the wall." I love this kind of thing — a window into everyday life long ago. Via ArtsJournal.


Photograph via Domino's Deco Files

3 comments :

La Maison Fou said...

What a view and a spot to enjoy coffee and sit back & talk! Just great looking...
L

d i a n a m u s e said...

The story about the Thomas Crowley letter in the wall is amazing. What treasure!

liza said...

I can't wait to go through these after my little one goes to sleep!

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